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The best tool ever?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
http://www.toolhaus.org/cgi-bin/negs

Dont know if you've already discovered this but on the previous posts blm wanted to be able just to see negs. here ya go
post #2 of 10

Re: The best tool ever?

Quote:
Originally Posted by andya
http://www.toolhaus.org/cgi-bin/negs

Dont know if you've already discovered this but on the previous posts blm wanted to be able just to see negs. here ya go
Check the link up at the top which says 'ebay negatives' We've known about that for a long time. I was just wishing that EBAY would incorporate that back into their site because not everyone is as industrious or google-skilled as we are...
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
ah well i thought id better share it anyway someone sent me the link ages ago when i was complaining about having to look through hundreds of feedback to find out about sellers.
post #4 of 10
yes thanks a lot for the ebay negative feedback button. it help a lot
post #5 of 10
that could be very deceiving..a seller that has 99.9 percent positive shouldnt be judged on one or two negative feedback.
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZATHANSRULE
that could be very deceiving..a seller that has 99.9 percent positive shouldnt be judged on one or two negative feedback.
You are correct, but its also useful to see what the negatives that a person received were. It gives you a more complete picture. Shows you the statistical outliers and anecdotes.
post #7 of 10
It also says that, inherently, that we're a lazy society. To get a well rounded idea of anything, you cant just look at the facts you want to look at--you have to consider all facts and all sides. Just on principal, the idea of an "only negative feedback search" is a slippery slope
post #8 of 10
the only thing that makes me confused about this whole argument is that i recall last time in a thread about the miami sellers, you (Zathansrule) were saying you should consider every neg response 100XXX times more heavily compared to every positive response...it sounded bias but maybe it was because you were referring to the miami sellers (to put it in context) so i may understand that since you blatantly dont get along with those sellers...

a little hypcritical, but understandably so (in a sense) :P
post #9 of 10
I dont call them the "miami sellers". I usually distinguish between the two.

As far as the negatives. Yes, they should count heavier than positive, maybe at at a rate of 10-1, but and this is the point--the bidder must see the feedback in context
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZATHANSRULE
I dont call them the "miami sellers". I usually distinguish between the two.

As far as the negatives. Yes, they should count heavier than positive, maybe at at a rate of 10-1, but and this is the point--the bidder must see the feedback in context
I agree that, statistically speaking, the bidder should be able to view the context in which negative feedbacks occur - eg: some people are going to try and use the relative anonymity of the online medium to try and mislead and skew facts to their advantage, but that being said, it's still a useful tool for people to see just the circumstances in which a seller got negs.

Many times, the savvy ebay user can view the feedbackERs feedback and take than in context of the feedbackEEs stuff. My point is that you should be able to view the data both at its MOST and LEAST granular.

Summarizations are useful insofar as they reduce large numbers of anecdotal data points to a smooth distribution curve. But sometimes its also helpful to view the actual outlying data points. For instance, 98% of people who take ibuprofen are fine, but 2% have adverse effects. Maybe there's something retarded about the immune system of that 2% or some portion thereof, but maybe there's a legitimate problem? Its always useful to be able to view the raw data rather than summarization.

Oh and by the way, there's a difference between principle and principal.
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