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Tricky or Euro hem

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
I just hemmed a few pairs of jeans using this method of reattaching the original hem, and I know this topic comes up occasionally. Does anyone have any interest in my posting some step by step photos of how to do it yourself?
Samantha
post #2 of 32
Sure! do you need a sewing machine to do it?? Obviously i don't sew at all, but I could teach my friend if you tell me how
post #3 of 32
I would be interested to know how to do it. I have a lot of jeans that need to be hemmed. no money to get it done. And I have a sewing machine.
post #4 of 32

Re: Tricky or Euro hem

Quote:
Originally Posted by Velliety
I just hemmed a few pairs of jeans using this method of reattaching the original hem, and I know this topic comes up occasionally. Does anyone have any interest in my posting some step by step photos of how to do it yourself?
Samantha
do you know how to do both types of hem?
post #5 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yes, you do need a sewing machine, but you don't need to be a skilled seamstress to do these. They're actually pretty easy. I've got one more pair to do tonight - a new pair of NYD. I'll photograph as I go and post sometime tomorrow. Everything of mine needs to be hemmed (30" inseam), so I save a lot of money doing them myself.
Samantha
post #6 of 32
samantha, are you doing the hem where the material is tucked underneath or are you cutting the jean & then reatttaching the hem? i know how to do both, but i prefer the one that does not have the bulky leftover fabric. i think pics of both steps would be helpful & cost saving for thoes who have sewing machines
post #7 of 32
I found the original thread:
http://honestforum.com/viewtopic.php...hlight=hemming
That posts a link to this website that has pics:
http://www.figandplum.com/archives/H...%20a%20Pro.doc
post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by paloma
samantha, are you doing the hem where the material is tucked underneath or are you cutting the jean & then reatttaching the hem? i know how to do both, but i prefer the one that does not have the bulky leftover fabric. i think pics of both steps would be helpful & cost saving for thoes who have sewing machines
I did not know there was one than one kind. I take mine to nordstrom and they fold and tuck like you ar saying. And that extra fabric does bother me depending on the jean. IS one hem called tricky and the other euro? maybe i should ask around at some tailors...
post #9 of 32
In this auction they have pictures of a hem that was taken in and folded over
http://cgi.ebay.com/Seven-7-FOR-ALL-...cmd ZViewItem
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAmRenee
In this auction they have pictures of a hem that was taken in and folded over
http://cgi.ebay.com/Seven-7-FOR-ALL-...cmd ZViewItem
Heh, that's the seller with the fake sugarplums linking to my auction
post #11 of 32
yeah. I know.
She did sell a pair of jeans I wanted before. I think they were like aruba wash.
post #12 of 32
the fig & plum diagram is the one with the extra fabric. i dont like that method. i'd show everyone how to do it the other way when i have time to hem another pair of havannas. or samantha do you have directions?
post #13 of 32
Has anyone taken their sevens to The Buckle for hemming? At the store here, they will hem jeans with the original hem for $7 if they are not a brand the Buckle carries. I just found this out and am taking some this week. They have a seamstress who comes in twice a week because they hem jeans for free if you buy them from there.
post #14 of 32
Thread Starter 
Paloma - basically they are really the same type of hem - you can either leave the extra fabric if there's not much, or you can cut it off. After folding the hem up and sewing, I usually have way too much fabric left over since I'm so short, so I cut it off leaving about a quarter of an inch and overstitch it with a zigzag so it doesn't fray. But you fold them both up the same way and sew close to the original hem stitch.
Samantha
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticdolphin
That posts a link to this website that has pics:
http://www.figandplum.com/archives/H...%20a%20Pro.doc
This is the same method that I use. After you've sewed the excess inside, you can either leave it in there OR cut the extra fabric out. It's so easy....as long as you have a sewing machine and can sew a straight line.
post #16 of 32
I would adore directions. I have 4 pairs of jeans that I can't wear until I get them hemmed...no matter how big my shoes are, 34" is still way too long!
post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 
Actually this link that Mysticdolphin put up pretty much sums up how to do it. Nice to know it's been documented already. The only thing I have to add is that I cut the extra fabric off to about 1/4 to 1/2 inch and use a zigzag overstitch to keep it from fraying.
Samantha

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticdolphin
I found the original thread:
http://honestforum.com/viewtopic.php...hlight=hemming
That posts a link to this website that has pics:
http://www.figandplum.com/archives/H...%20a%20Pro.doc
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessani
I would adore directions. I have 4 pairs of jeans that I can't wear until I get them hemmed...no matter how big my shoes are, 34" is still way too long!
nooo...don't hem!!

it makes me sad when stuff in my size gets hemmed...

but I guess if you REALLY like it..
post #19 of 32
How would you do a hem when you have to take a lot off (i.e. 4 inches) and you have flared jeans, since the radius at the leg opening is going to be smaller then what you started off with.
post #20 of 32
I have had my jeans hemmed profesionally most of the time, and a couple of times, and after I had gotten my jeans back and put them through the washer/dryer, the cuff turned upwards and won't turn back down.

Is it the thread they used that shrunk? Or perhaps the person that hemmed it did it incorrectly? I asked for a euro hem and it still did this....doesn't make sense to me.

I have about six pairs that need to be hemmed but now I'm scared and dont' know where to bring them. Should I attempt to do them myself? I need to take up about 4 inches.

Any advice would be great!
post #21 of 32
I've found that sometimes the euro/tricky hem isn't necessary if you're patient. I find that hem bulky & I can't get used to it. I do all my own alterations (regular jeans hem, not euro/tricky) & either do 1 or 2 things most of the time: 1. hem slightly too short 2. hem slightly too long.

On the flipside, when I hem slightly too short & it erks me to death. I'll let the hem back out & make the hem long enough since I leave crazy big seam allowances(1/2"+). This is after about 6-10 washings when I let the hem back out cuz I'm lazy. I notice the hem that's on the underside is faded like the original hem. Once I turn this hem so it's facing forward it looks like I bought em that way.
post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
One of the reasons that the hem wants to flip back up is because there is so much denim right where the vertical seams on the legs meet the vertical seams on the hem - it wants to flip up there first. You'll think I'm nuts, but if you fold the hem the way you want it to go, and take a hammer and beat where the huge bunch of denim is at the seam, it flattens it out and the hem will lay flat.
Samantha

Quote:
Originally Posted by revolve
I have had my jeans hemmed profesionally most of the time, and a couple of times, and after I had gotten my jeans back and put them through the washer/dryer, the cuff turned upwards and won't turn back down.

Is it the thread they used that shrunk? Or perhaps the person that hemmed it did it incorrectly? I asked for a euro hem and it still did this....doesn't make sense to me.

I have about six pairs that need to be hemmed but now I'm scared and dont' know where to bring them. Should I attempt to do them myself? I need to take up about 4 inches.

Any advice would be great!
post #23 of 32
I personally prefer the "sandwich" method of hemming..less bulky fabric left. A little tedious, but IMO better than the tucking method.
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by toughcookie
I've found that sometimes the euro/tricky hem isn't necessary if you're patient. I find that hem bulky & I can't get used to it. I do all my own alterations (regular jeans hem, not euro/tricky) & either do 1 or 2 things most of the time: 1. hem slightly too short 2. hem slightly too long.

On the flipside, when I hem slightly too short & it erks me to death. I'll let the hem back out & make the hem long enough since I leave crazy big seam allowances(1/2"+). This is after about 6-10 washings when I let the hem back out cuz I'm lazy. I notice the hem that's on the underside is faded like the original hem. Once I turn this hem so it's facing forward it looks like I bought em that way.
Totally! I don't really understand (aside from loosing distressing) what the point of the euro hem is; I agree that it's too bulky and looks wierd. I think the look of the original distressing can be easily recreated in most cases after frequent wearings (and with a little manual work, it seems more personal this way to me); alothough I would say the euro hem is probably necessary on jeans like Antik and perhaps some tr; or any denim with a decorative hem.

And after all, hemming the 'regular' technique is how the jeans were hemmed by the manufacturer in the first place. Maybe some people don't notice, but because I too, do all of my own hemming, I do notice.

I also have the problem of hemming too short or too long sometimes! Althought this last time I hemmed a pair of coh, they were perfect!
post #25 of 32
Does anyone have a link to the "sandwich" method?

I might try this at home with a cheap pair of jeans first.

Oh and Samantha I would love if you post your process for hemming your jeans (if it's different from the figandplum one). TIA
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