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hi...... where the diesel jeans made?, which company? last 7 year i working in laser on denim, so...

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 17

Diesel jeans are made in Italy, where the brand started. You can also tell if they are hand finished or not by the sewn in italian flag above the yoke on the back of the jean.

 

You should see the amount of production they go through for one pair, it really bugs me when people complain about the price, you really are getting a one off pair of jeans.

 

Worked for diesel for a long time and absolutely love it. 

post #3 of 17

I would be really interested in hearing more about what goes into the production of a pair of Diesel jeans, would you be able to tell us more?  I have tried searching through Google to learn more about the work environment in the factories and what goes into making them, how long an average pair takes to make, etc.  Anything you can add would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!

post #4 of 17

Yeah of course

 

In our training we have to watch alot of DVDs so we appreciate the brand and the effort that goes into it.

 

When you buy a pair of diesel jeans of course im sure you notice the difference in price between a lot of them despite the cut is being exactly the same?

 

This is all because of the amount of preparation and work that is done for each individual pair.

I own a pair of Lowky 8RI that retailed at my store for a mere £55, and Lowky as well as 8ZB which we at the time sold for £100.

 

The lowky 8RI are so much cheaper simply because they wern't treated as much.

When watching the training dvds staff at diesel talk about how long it takes to make the jeans, one pair, which the woman did not mention the style, took 14 days to complete.

 

Of course the fit and cutting of the denim is factory based with template and machines, so the fit varying between the same style will stay the same. Hence why people often coming to my store know the fit they want and stick to it, buying it in an array of washes.

 

Once the basic structure has been completed, the hemming is the next important thing. They cross stitch them in such a strange way, there are two different types of hemming that they use but I will have to get back to you on which ones it has been a long time since i have watched the DVDs!

 

They put the jeans on a leg mannequin and this is where the real work begins.

Depending on what kind of wash they want to achieve it can take from hours to weeks to get the desired look. It very much looked like they were painting the jeans, with immediate access to over 600 colours of dye aswell that is also tailored to the wash. They can wash the jeans hundreds of times in water before they have the desired colour too. 

 

To get the stonewash effect approximately 1-2.5kg of pumice stone is used (per pair), this is all done by hand of course

 

The whiskering effect or lightening effect is done by creasing the jeans in the desired place and either spraying the jeans or again painting them.

 

As Im not a sewing lady/jean making woman i probably am making mistakes in my terminology, sorry!

 

The Italian flag is hand sewn in as an official mark boasting that the jeans were hand finished in italy. If you look many diesel jeans, despite having the same wash and fit often look different. If you compare the Larkee 8C0 with others you will notice all the "lightning effects" will be in different places on the jeans, at different intensities. True diesel fans that come in often ask me to bring down the same size up to 10 pairs so they can select the one they like the look of best, after all they are all different.

 

Rips and abrasions on the jeans are achieved by a sort of sandpaper hooked device the woman looked very excited to use, just scraping away at the jeans.

However allthough it is inevitable that they will eventually get bigger, the denim is cross stitched so they dont grow too much when they are frayed or ripped.

 

I'm sure I have bored you but if you want to know anything specific just let me know, and if I dont know I can definitely find out for you.

 

Be stupid :)

Peace x 

post #5 of 17

how does it come that an pair of thanaz 8ww crushes at the knee? 320 euro pair of jeans? answer pls?

post #6 of 17

Ahh I'm not positive. We dont have those jeans in, nor the wash, being outlet.

 

I'm guessing it could be one of 4 reasons

 

1. The spacing in the seams, is it ever so slightly closer together in the knee area (although i have never known thanaz jeans to have this)

2. The cotton is sewn at a different intensity (eg. 90 degree angle)

3. Is the knee area treated? E.g does it feel tougher/softer than the rest of the jean giving that area a different feel

4. Some denim naturally creases in places where it is placed under stress eg. knees, backs of knees and underneath the butt, especially if it is a softer denim, Im pretty sure this wash is 2% elastane...

 

I will ask my manager and get back to you, these are just my guesses.

 

The reason these jeans are quite expensive they clearly have had a lot of work done

They have been bleached and abrased as well as hand finished, and has had pumice stone treatment about 1kg per pair of this wash

The attention to detail is lovely.

You must be proud to own them!

 

I will try and get back to you tomorrow as i will be working! 

 

post #7 of 17

yeah the 8ww wash was limited or something like that and yes this jean is stretch =) in fact i never climbed a wall in this jean or worked hard in it. however complaining at a diesel store makes no sense because noone feels responsible for anything and ther is no number for a head office in italy....funny isnt it.

only outcome was to buy another pair of 8ww. be stupid  ;D

post #8 of 17


can you reword this? crushes at the knee? you mean a hole ripped in it or what?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 118i View Post

how does it come that an pair of thanaz 8ww crushes at the knee? 320 euro pair of jeans? answer pls?

post #9 of 17


thank you so much for typing all this out. very informative and i appreciate you sharing your behind the scenes information. i often say when i go into a diesel store to the employees of how i'd love to take a tour of the factory and see how everything is achieved. i think this is the closest i'll get.

 

i understand what you're saying about 'it was almost like they were painting the jeans' i recently got the zatiny 74f and was intrigued by the worn areas on the knee up to the thighs. it looked white head on. when viewed at an angle there was this yellowish orange tint. almost like they just very lightly dusted this area w/ dye to where you could only see it if you were looking for it.  this sort of attention to detail is what i love about diesel jeans.

 

the one thing i was curious about though is some of the rips and holes to me seem like they are manufactured in the weaving of the fabric. when i turn the jeans inside out the hole seems to be sewn that way. not destroyed or ripped.  example. my zatiny 8sv if turned inside out the long distressed rips that go w/ the grain of the jean appear to be made that way?  anything you can add to this or can you clairfy the creation of these?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnieatDiesel View Post

Yeah of course

 

In our training we have to watch alot of DVDs so we appreciate the brand and the effort that goes into it.

 

When you buy a pair of diesel jeans of course im sure you notice the difference in price between a lot of them despite the cut is being exactly the same?

 

This is all because of the amount of preparation and work that is done for each individual pair.

I own a pair of Lowky 8RI that retailed at my store for a mere £55, and Lowky as well as 8ZB which we at the time sold for £100.

 

The lowky 8RI are so much cheaper simply because they wern't treated as much.

When watching the training dvds staff at diesel talk about how long it takes to make the jeans, one pair, which the woman did not mention the style, took 14 days to complete.

 

Of course the fit and cutting of the denim is factory based with template and machines, so the fit varying between the same style will stay the same. Hence why people often coming to my store know the fit they want and stick to it, buying it in an array of washes.

 

Once the basic structure has been completed, the hemming is the next important thing. They cross stitch them in such a strange way, there are two different types of hemming that they use but I will have to get back to you on which ones it has been a long time since i have watched the DVDs!

 

They put the jeans on a leg mannequin and this is where the real work begins.

Depending on what kind of wash they want to achieve it can take from hours to weeks to get the desired look. It very much looked like they were painting the jeans, with immediate access to over 600 colours of dye aswell that is also tailored to the wash. They can wash the jeans hundreds of times in water before they have the desired colour too. 

 

To get the stonewash effect approximately 1-2.5kg of pumice stone is used (per pair), this is all done by hand of course

 

The whiskering effect or lightening effect is done by creasing the jeans in the desired place and either spraying the jeans or again painting them.

 

As Im not a sewing lady/jean making woman i probably am making mistakes in my terminology, sorry!

 

The Italian flag is hand sewn in as an official mark boasting that the jeans were hand finished in italy. If you look many diesel jeans, despite having the same wash and fit often look different. If you compare the Larkee 8C0 with others you will notice all the "lightning effects" will be in different places on the jeans, at different intensities. True diesel fans that come in often ask me to bring down the same size up to 10 pairs so they can select the one they like the look of best, after all they are all different.

 

Rips and abrasions on the jeans are achieved by a sort of sandpaper hooked device the woman looked very excited to use, just scraping away at the jeans.

However allthough it is inevitable that they will eventually get bigger, the denim is cross stitched so they dont grow too much when they are frayed or ripped.

 

I'm sure I have bored you but if you want to know anything specific just let me know, and if I dont know I can definitely find out for you.

 

Be stupid :)

Peace x 

post #10 of 17

yeah it was in july when i was at an medical seminar where we learned to improve our skills in reanimating people etc and under the training i had to kneee down for 2-3 times and after that i watched my knee and saw a skratch or rip at the knee. it is to say that i kneed normal on a normal floor without  rubbing the jean on the floor or something like that.

as i asked the local store they just said that they r not rsponsible for that.....they just gave me a number for the austrian diesel head office which also ignored my problem and were not able to give me further advice or another number where i could ask for help. 

in fact noone felt responsible for that problem or could give me a number for a main office...it looked to me that diesel dosent cares about costumer care...

post #11 of 17


why not leave the hole? i would think it would match or not even be noticable w/ the wash on these jeans? i can honestly say ive never had any diesel jeans that got ruined or quality that was lacking (maybe that is the reason for no customer service phone line hehe)  i have zathans from 2003 that i still wear and do not have any worn spots. usually jeans will start to get a hole around the inner corners at the top of the back pockets. i have never experienced this w/ diesel, but have w/ just about every other brand. how they do this i have no idea, but im glad they do!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 118i View Post

yeah it was in july when i was at an medical seminar where we learned to improve our skills in reanimating people etc and under the training i had to kneee down for 2-3 times and after that i watched my knee and saw a skratch or rip at the knee. it is to say that i kneed normal on a normal floor without  rubbing the jean on the floor or something like that.

as i asked the local store they just said that they r not rsponsible for that.....they just gave me a number for the austrian diesel head office which also ignored my problem and were not able to give me further advice or another number where i could ask for help. 

in fact noone felt responsible for that problem or could give me a number for a main office...it looked to me that diesel dosent cares about costumer care...

post #12 of 17

the hole was 4cm long........

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeradical82 View Post

 

the one thing i was curious about though is some of the rips and holes to me seem like they are manufactured in the weaving of the fabric. when i turn the jeans inside out the hole seems to be sewn that way. not destroyed or ripped.  example. my zatiny 8sv if turned inside out the long distressed rips that go w/ the grain of the jean appear to be made that way?  anything you can add to this or can you clairfy the creation of these?
 

 


I'm not 100% positive what you mean :S But yes not all diesel jeans are abrased at the end of the process. Some holes and rips in the jeans are purposefully sewn this way to begin with, especially larger ones such as larkee 8zf for example. The thread will be crossed stitched ( not all diesel jeans are stitched the same way) at the holes to prevent further tearing ( of course inevitably they will get wider over time) They also use silicone on the jeans a lot of the time to finish this and make it slightly tougher. Also some holes have a plastic foundation to reinforce it, usually the same wash or colour as the jeans, and you can see the patches if you turn the jeans inside out (not 8SV though!)  A pair of jeans with a silicone finish usually weigh about 13oz too.

 

I dont know if they use the holes in templates or not. Im guessing no as many rips are different and incomparable to another pair of the same style and wash.

 

Is this what you meant? Sorry about the late reply. 

 

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by 118i View Post

yeah it was in july when i was at an medical seminar where we learned to improve our skills in reanimating people etc and under the training i had to kneee down for 2-3 times and after that i watched my knee and saw a skratch or rip at the knee. it is to say that i kneed normal on a normal floor without  rubbing the jean on the floor or something like that.

as i asked the local store they just said that they r not rsponsible for that.....they just gave me a number for the austrian diesel head office which also ignored my problem and were not able to give me further advice or another number where i could ask for help. 

in fact noone felt responsible for that problem or could give me a number for a main office...it looked to me that diesel dosent cares about costumer care...


Ahh im sorry i did not realise you meant ripped! i thought you meant crease, as the boys at my work allways say how their thanaz crease up at the knee, especially if it is a softer fabric.

 

You may have just been unlucky with that pair, perhaps they had a very small defect unoticeable. Do you know if they were irregulars? Blue labelled items often have a tiny fault that can get worse over time.

Your local diesel store is WRONG if they say they are not responsible.

 

By law (in u.k) but i'm sure it is the same wherever you are, you are ENTITLED to a refund if the item is faulty.

In england we are proud of our customer service, it is a shame that you have not received the same courtesy. I would persist if I were you, perhaps they are hesitant to give refunds because to be fair we do get a lot of customers that claim the item is faulty when they have clearly been worn hundreds of times. I know this is not the case for you. 

 

Persist with the store you bought them from rather than Head office as they are often so busy they will not sympathise as much as your main store. They sort out everything from deliveries to pay checks, refunds are usually not their priority.

 

Peace. 

post #15 of 17

p.s  that further information....

 

I found out that today that they use a technique called "zigzag" stitching which basically means the line is staggered rather than straight when interwoven

 

Also,

 

When the jeans are on the mannequin they actually blow them up so they are turgid with an air machine. The leg mannequin can be spun round.

 

A lot of the employees actually personalise their tools to get the best results because of hand size!

 

And sandpaper attached to a block is used to make further abrasions, just like we use at home.

 

post #16 of 17

you should take some pics of the artists in action! i'd love to see them ripping and dying away :)

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeradical82 View Post

you should take some pics of the artists in action! i'd love to see them ripping and dying away :)



Ohhh no I don't get to see them do it that's done overseas to me! I just asked my area manager for more information, and I got to watch another DVD about it and read up on the process. 

 

I wish I could personally go and see the process. I bet a lot of the work is kept secret though on certain effects and styling. 

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DenimBlog.com › Welcome to the DenimBlog Community! › Mens Designer Jeans  › Diesel Jeans › hi...... where the diesel jeans made?, which company? last 7 year i working in laser on denim, so want to do job like this big company....plz. help.