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SEARCHING 4: authentic RL

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
How about RL ?

Does Zhenjie sell authentic RL? Does anybody know of anybody that has authentic RL?
post #2 of 20

.

Stick to your jeans guys. As a rule of thumb in the polo shirt business they are gray market with no possible way of authentication. When I used to work at Marshall Fields on Michigan Ave. a long time ago they would get them at slightly less tahn 50% of retail and that chain bought in huge quantities. So lets do the math guys the tags say $52.50. You will get authentic for no less than $23-$25. Hopefully you guys will realize this and stick to your little jean thing. Anything you buy for $9,10, 13,$14 per is not authentic.
post #3 of 20
Hi,

They are all fake...


IT IS THE GREY MARKET...

NO PAPERS = NO GUARANTEE OF AUTHENTICITY...

ITS THIS SIMPLE!!!

WHY BUY LACOSTE FOR $35 A PIECE WHEN YOU CAN GET IT FOR $14...
post #4 of 20

.

\ Redfred knows what he is talking about and when the rest of you realize it you'll feel alot better.
post #5 of 20
OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

I HAVE TAKLED TO CHINA GARMENT BEFORE...
INFAMOUS FOR SUPPLYING FAKES AND KNOCK OFF GEAR...
THEY TOLD ME ZHENJIE WAS A CLIENT OF THEIRS!!!

ZHENJIE'S POLOS ARE GOOD QUALITY BUT THERE ARE NO WAY AUTHENTIC. COMPARE THE FABRIC AND YOU WILL SEE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ORIGINAL AND HIS...

IF YOU WANT AUTHENTIC RALPH LAUREN, YOU HAVE TO GET THEM FRMO AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS...

ZHENJIE IS JUST A BROKER FROM A SUPPLIER IN CHINA...WHO PRODUCE COUNTERFEIT GOODS...BUT HIS POLOS ARE GOOD QUALITY

IF INTO GREY MARKET GOODS THAT IS...
post #6 of 20
can you prove your claims redfredgupi?

Chinagarment....lol . Seems like you and Dave are quite suss..
post #7 of 20
YES CHINA GARMENT DID TELL ME YOU WERE A REALLY GOOD CLIENT OF THEIRS...

ALSO I KNOW WHO YOUR SUPPLIER IS AND I KNOW WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPLIES...HINT HINT HINT EVISU HINT HINT FAKE FAKE...

HINT HINT HINT DIESEL HINT HINT HINT HINT FAKE...

YOU GET THE DRILL....ITS FUNNY HOW YOU ACCUSE OTHER PEOPLE FOR SELLING FAKES WHEN YOU ALSO ARE??NO NO NO??? EH EHE EH EHEEHEH

ZHENJIE PENJIE
post #8 of 20

Ralph Lauren Direct

Ok lesson for you fools.

NO MAJOR DESIGNER OR LABEL WILL SELL TO A MIDDLEMAN (JOBBER) that is in their right mind.


YOU MUST OWN A STORE, thats right boys and girls Brick & Mortar in order to get an account with 99% of the major brands out there.

Furthermore good luck getting an account because your store has to be at least 10miles away from any other store that carries Ralph Lauren clothing to even be considered.

Also the WHOLESALE price for RL prodcuts range from about 22.00 to 52.00 per piece depending on style and qty.

If you are stupid enough to believe that you can get polos for 12.00 each then I have some really awesome junk bonds for you to buy as well.

Just email me and Ill send you some gift certificates for Manolo Shoes at wholesale. I sell Authentic Manolos for 1.00 a pair. Honest and I can provide fake paperwork if you need it as well.

Man some of you are idiots.

Zhenjie is a liar and a faker, hell 99% of the people on these forums are crooks and some dont even know it.

I purchased authentic polos from a gentleman in Chicago on a store liquidation, they were MADE IN BOLIVIA as almost ALL polos sold in the US and once compared to Zhenjies side by side Zhenjies looked like trash.

Inferior quality cotton with ChinaXXX.com trash.

If you dont believe me then spend the time to call up ralph lauren corporate.

Ask for a gentleman in Atlanta name JOHN DALZELL. he is the regional director for wholesale account. Yes I have his number and no you cant have it. Get off your lazy ass and find it yourself.

If you still think you can get polos for 12.00 each then you should be shot.


Peace
post #9 of 20
ZHENJIS POLOS ARE NOTHING COMPARED THE AUTHENTIC ONES!!
LOOK AT HIS POST IT SAYS AUTHENTICITY GUARANTEED
WHAT A BLOODY LIAR HE IS!!
THE TING WHICH IS FUNNY WAS THAT IN THE FORUM HE SAID HIS FAMILY HAD CONNECTIONS TO GETTING THE RL!!
HAHAHAHAH
WHAT SOME BULLSHIT HE IS SAYING. I KNOW HIS SUPPLIER AND NO WAY HE IS RELATED TO ZHENJIE, ZHENJIE IS JUST LYING!! HE IS JUST A MIDDLE MAN!!! ALL HE DOES IT ACCEPT ORDERS AND FORWARD THEM TO THE CHINESE SUPPLIER! HE HAS NO CONNECTIONS TO AUTHENTIC RL!! AND TO NOTE TO ZHENJIE, RL IS CLOSELY WATCHING YOU
post #10 of 20
HAVE YOU ALSO NOTICED HOW ZHENJIE IS SO 'COOL' AND TRIES TO ACT LIKE A GOOD PUPPY? ALWAYS SIDING PEOPLE ACCUSING OTHERS OF SELLING FAKES? HE ALSO ACCUSES OTHER PEOPLE OF SELLING FAKES AND ALWAYS GIVES HIS OPINION LIKE HE DOES NOT SELL FAKE. THAT IS THE THING, I DONT LIKE PEOPLE WHO TRY TO BE TWO FACED LIKE ZHENJIE!!

WHAT A LIAR!! HE SELLS FAKES ALSO!!! RALPH LAUREN IS SO EASY TO GET MADE HELL IF YOU GIVE ME A STITCHING MACHINE I CAN MAKE ONE FOR YOU NOW? WHAT COLOR DO YOU WANT?
post #11 of 20
LOL redneckgupi,

prove email logs with Chinagarment then...?
and now you are connected with RL ....wow you must be some sort of super international fashion police.

Also I think your capslock is broken (or your just plain stupid and dont know how to post).

You'll be suprised to know that I do have relatives in the textile areas in Shengzhen and Hong Kong. But everyone seems to know me SO WELL!.

morons....
post #12 of 20
I do not need to prove anything regarding what i said...

All i have is my balls and my word...if you look at zhenjie's post, look at how many times he is quickly to judge and accuse other sellers...compare the quality of zhenjis' polos with real ones from shops, the latter are much softer. I am not arguing abuot zhenjie seling fake, i am accusing him of being two faced.

I understand he only does that to make sure no one actually questions his apparel and finds out his supplier. However, instead of quickly going around and accusing people he can keep his mouth shut and mind his own business rather than bassh other peepz na mean.
post #13 of 20
My name is Fred Smith
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
an excellent post by tomonhoneymoon on w411:

Quote:
I have personally visited few companies making authentic goods for some brands and ask them to give me whatever they have surplus , for ex. I visited Diesel shirts Manufacturing company in India, they said we can give you after removing all lables, tags , butons and all other marks which proves it is diesel, the same answer I get from RL , A&F and few other brand owners licencee manufacture, in India, Sri Lanka as well as China , not a singlr company was ready to give a single shirt / polo with all lables, I can't understand how can you get 50 shirts/ polo/ anything authentic at 10-12$ delivered.

And the best part is the actual brand owners appoints few people directly to these Licence company who keeps inventory of finished / semi finished and rejected goods and also the way to dispose them, so please forget that you are buying anything Authentic.

Still if anybody thinks he is geting anything Authentic from Asia , please .......... remove this from your mind . I am not a reseller or competitor of anybody , this is based on my Experience
post #15 of 20
Oh my! No wonder Fred's guppi is red! The poor old sod is bashing without actually having purchased anything from Zhengie!

Your language gives you away bucko so I know you aren't a yank...but that's ok...I don't discriminate against that or even guys waving their little red guppies around (but please don't mistake tolerance for acceptance, I'm actually laughing my hiney off)

You see, I despise the yahoos who don the sanctimonious mantle of fighting the good fight, ie: the "lets get rid of fakes fight", but really, they're just looking for an opportunity to trash someone. ( it feels soooo good to them) It's a good cover because no one wants to be the troglodite taking an opposition position. Seems poor old Dave is attracting more and more of that type to his circle and it reflects badly on him. Love it huh? Trashing, bashing, screwing with their business without a solid basis for your accusations?

Buy something from the guy. Hold it in your puny little arms. Rub it on your (hopefully) hirusute face. Then call him a fake seller.
Otherwise YOU appear to be a limp, red, guppie, Fred.

Disclaimer: I have never purchased merchandise from Zhengie nor do I know who Little Red Fred is...and I really don't care. I do hate all unfounded harrassment by competeing vendors going on...that sucks.
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
I agree with you on the point about having facts to back up your allegations. In fact I have pm'd redfred to make sure that he can back up all his claims.

As mentioned in the rules I would greatly appreciate it if people respectfully challenged vendors. Ad-hominem attacks and disrespect are not cool.

However, it is oft repeated on the w411 to buy from a vendor to back up your allegations. I disagree with that statement and do not have any such rules for this forum. I have trouble trusting somebody that sells diesel zathans for $40 or Lacoste for $12. Ideally it would be good to buy things to test their authenticity, however the amount of fake merchandise that you would probably collect would be overwhelming.
post #17 of 20
Fred: PLease don't take the above post personally, I want to talk business with you now.
I'd like to send you a "stitching machine" (we like to call them sewing machines) if you'll send your mailing address.
I want to order RL sweaters. Darn if I can find them anywhere wholesale!Please send prices.
I just love red guppies,
Zoobie
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoobie
Fred: PLease don't take the above post personally, I want to talk business with you now.
I'd like to send you a "stitching machine" (we like to call them sewing machines) if you'll send your mailing address.
I want to order RL sweaters. Darn if I can find them anywhere wholesale!Please send prices.
I just love red guppies,
Zoobie
You're a moron Zoobie... thinking you're all clever and what not. Guess what? Stitching machines and sewing machines are two completely different things. A stitching machine can easily mass produce the embrodery RL uses for its logo. You're so quick to back the vendor, yet you even say this post doesn't concern you at all, nor have you ever purchased from him. Good logic, hipocrite.

Disclaimer: People who place disclaimers in their posts are obviously unable to back anything they say, and use a disclaimer as a defense.
post #19 of 20
A couple of people are claiming that legitimate brands NEVER offer their surplus to the grey market. They would have you believe that there is no such thing as an authentic piece being sold wholesale off-price. According to them, it is impossible.

They would be wrong. Here is some information on Grey Markets from the UK. You will find verifiable facts that numerous brands are available through the grey market. They are not fakes. They are not authorized by the trademark holder, in most cases, but the goods themselves are identical in construction and quality to the authentic ones with papers. They are simply going through an unauthorized distribution channel.

Some of the brands listed in this report as having authentic goods in the Grey Market: Calvin Klein, Levis, Tommy Hilfiger, FUBU.

From the House of Commons report on the Grey Market:

Why does parallel trading occur?

37. Parallel and grey traders take advantage of cheaper prices in one country to make a profit by selling these goods in another country where they are generally sold at higher prices. CIPA told us that in their view, grey and parallel trading derives from decisions taken by brand owners as to where and how they sell. "Where differential pricing of standard stock is encouraged by brand owners, grey and parallel trading will occur."[89] There are a number of other possible reasons for the same goods being priced differently in different markets such as: exchange rates; brand owners wishing to offload surplus stock; brand owners producing additional goods in order to boost sales figures; differences in handling and promotion costs. Differences in product quality or composition may lead to price differences. The extent to which factors other than price facilitate grey and parallel trade, inevitably varies from case to case.

38. It was also pointed out that "much parallel trading stems from bad husbandry on the part of the brand owners":[90] for example, careless dumping of old or outdated stock or inefficient distribution channels. Apparently legitimate branded stock may be available cheaply from factory over-runs in the country of manufacture, facilitated by an absence of control by brand holders over licensees and contracted manufacturers. Philippa Clare of Rishworth Chase told us that "the brand owners in my opinion give far too much information to one particular manufacturer and have a level of trust in that manufacturer which is at one level endearing but at another level extremely irritating".[91] A finished garment can be produced from start to finish in just one factory. She quoted one case where a brand holder even gave a factory owner "the plates to make the swing tags and the specification for the string".[92]

49. Trade marks are the primary vehicle for the advertising and branding of broadly similar clothes and footwear from competing manufacturers. Supermarkets, primarily Tesco and Asda, have advertised unauthorised sales of 'designer' clothes for some time; Tesco is currently facing legal action initiated by Levi for selling such imports. We received evidence from Tesco and Asda, from a clothing warehouse, from traders involved in importing clothing, and from a company that traces consignments of grey goods, mainly clothing and footwear. We also received evidence from the British Brands Group who, although they mainly represent other sectors than clothing, do count Levi Strauss amongst their members. The DTI told us "across the sector prices are moderately higher in the European Community as compared with the USA, although prices in Japan are slightly higher than Europe".[137] Other commentators would describe the price differentials between the EU and USA as substantial.[138] As a consequence, prior to the Silhouette judgment, the majority of branded clothes sold in the UK outside official channels were sourced from America.

SELECTIVE AGREEMENTS

50. The question of selective agreements arose during this inquiry in the context of retailers attempting to sell certain brands of clothing, footwear and other branded goods as an authorised retailer and, on failing to do so, turning to grey and parallel importing.[139] In this sense, the operation of selective distribution networks is another reason for the existence of parallel trading. Selective distribution arrangements are those where the brand owner chooses distributors for their goods on the basis of "objective criteria necessary for the efficient distribution of the goods in question. Selected distributors normally provide some pre or after-sales services and may only sell to final consumers or other selected dealers".[140] Levi Strauss noted that "LSUK applies its criteria for potential new retail accounts consistently and objectively and if these are met will supply any retail applicant".[141] The British Brands Group told us that selective distribution agreements are "all fundamentally part of the brand" and that these agreements mean that certain requirements have to be met in order for that brand to be stocked through those distributors. "Typically they could be to do with the range of stocks that are sold in store, the environment, the refund policy to consumers."[142] Mr Noble told us that "these agreements allow these brands to compete in a ferociously competitive market place." He went on to say: "If you did not have the opportunity to influence the service that is provided to the consumer at the retail level there is an opportunity to actually reduce the number of brands in the market place which would actually reduce competition and reduce consumer choice at the end of the day".[143] A paper supplied to the Committee set out Levi's distribution policy stating that their network of 1,900 authorised dealers: "enables people to choose from a good range of current styles, sizes, fits, fabrics and colours; ensures consumers are served by trained staff with effective after-sales service; guards against counterfeits; provides continuity of supply".[144]

51. Tesco told us that they had approached branded clothing and footwear manufacturers such as Calvin Klein, Levi, Lacoste, Nike and Polo Ralph Lauren for 'approved status', that is to become official retailers. Largely they were refused "often without being made aware of what the criteria are and how we have scored against them".[145] Levi told the Committee that they had written to Tesco setting out the reasons for their refusal to supply them and supplied Tesco with guidance on how to satisfy the requirements for entry into the selective distribution system operated by Levi Strauss.[146] Asda told us that products they had wished to sell include "perfumes, cosmetics, sunglasses, watches, ties",[147] and that "without exception brand owners or their authorised intermediaries have refused Asda's requests for supplies of such products" mainly on the grounds that "Asda is not a suitable outlet".[148] Tesco told us that "despite our efforts, brand owners, including sportswear brands such as Nike, base their refusal to supply on concerns about the ability of Tesco to offer technical support. However, they are prepared to supply to retailers that sell through mail order and are unable to offer the consumer any technical support whatsoever".[149] It was as a result of these refusals - which in effect excludes them from the standard channels of distribution - that Tesco and Asda began grey importing of certain 'designer' goods. Indeed, it is not just supermarkets who are in this situation. Costco, the membership warehouse club, have also been refused supplies by UK manufacturers of premium branded goods and are, as a consequence, heavily dependent on parallel or grey imports for a range of products including apparel and shoes.[150]

52. Tesco also quoted as a reason given to them for non-supply the "necessity for customers to pass by other goods such as food".[151] Consumers' Association noted that: "If this condition were applied across the board, then Selfridges and Harrods should be refused supply because they have food halls".[152] Another reason given by some brands for refusing to supply retailers such as Tesco and Asda was based on the premise that their sales area is inconsistent with the brands' image. The Parallel Traders Association describe the current situation as one in which "manufacturers' selective and anti-competitive distribution networks and the artificially high prices set, are protected by the [Trade Marks] Directive".[153] Tesco concur, stating that "the effect of selective distribution and trade mark law as interpreted by the European court are detrimental to consumers. Prices are kept artificially high, suppliers controlled and competition stifled".[154]

PRICING

54. Price differentials in branded clothing can be substantial. The Committee received various examples of clothing or footwear that appears to have been priced at a higher level in the UK for no justifiable reason. For example, Ms Cross of Tesco told us that "yesterday we were offered UK produced Levi jeans from the States which had been originally put on sale in the States at a lower price than I can buy American Levi Jeans in the States".[156] Costco noted in their submission that, "it is well recognised that many brand owners pressurise their authorised dealers to resell products at artificially high prices".[157] We have seen little or no evidence that the selective distribution networks, in a relatively low service and technological sector such as clothing, work in the favour of consumers. Such networks serve as much to maintain high prices as they do to carry out the legitimate function of preserving the brands image. Under EU law such agreements must be objectively justifiable; we would be surprised if some of those agreements described to us would pass this test. We recommend that the Government actively encourage the Commission to instigate studies into the realities of the operation of selective distribution agreements.

BRAND OWNERS' CONSENT

55. Set against the cases where brand owners have refused to supply their products to supermarkets, are cases where brand owners have allowed their goods to be imported through 'grey' channels. Asda notes in their submission that they understand that "as much as 30-40% of Calvin Klein's turnover is generated through sales to companies outside the authorised reseller network".[158] Rishworth Chase, a trading company that specialises in tracing consignments of grey goods (particularly clothes) to ensure their authenticity, gave some examples of occasions where brand owners have given implicit if not explicit consent for their goods to be imported unofficially into the UK from outside of the EEA. Phillipa Clare told us that: "I know of instances where large consignments of well-know brands are sold in the United States with a representative of the brand holder.. present at the meeting who simply says nothing but knows perfectly well that those goods are coming into the European Union."[159] Rishworth Chase also stated that "many brands have been built in Europe through the 'parallel' market: Tommy Hilfiger is one example; FUBU is presently another label which is strategically releasing goods into the parallel market whilst holding off investment in an effective European distribution network". There are also brands, such as Chaps Ralph Lauren, that never set up European networks but "bring their product into Europe entirely under the wing of parallel traders".[160] In Rishworth Chase's opinion, the Silhouette case has resulted in European brands shipping their excess stock out to America. Traders stock houses are "getting container loads of Armani jeans, container loads of Prada bags and sunglasses galore and are calling us [Rishworth Chase] on a regular basis saying 'Why can we not bring this back into the European Union? It is European stock surely'" and the answer is no, because these stock houses are the first recipients of the stock and their contracts are likely to have a prohibition on reselling to the EU.[161] It is also worth noting, as Consumers' Association pointed out, that "the existence of product discounters like TK Maxx in the USA and UK, attests to the fact that manufacturers often wish to off-load stock, at a discount, that has not sold very well through official distributors".[162] This benefits the brand owner who is able to dispose of older or poorly performing stock and benefits consumers who are able to purchase certain branded goods at lower prices. It may not, of course, be welcome to the formally appointed distributors. We can only conclude that a number of clothing and footwear manufacturers at the very least connive in the supply of goods to the grey sector while naturally preferring to retain the option of using trade mark rights to halt it.
post #20 of 20
overstock.com has RL polos for between $25-$30...
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