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Does anyone else get static in their computer speakers from phone transmissions?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
So I keep my cellphone and my portable phone by my computer, and if I my speakers are on but nothing is playing I know I'm about to receive a call or text because I get bursts of static over them before my phone even rings. Is this a unique property of my cheap computer speakers or do lots of people experience this.

I've always just been curios, and I'm procrastinating doing more cleaning.
post #2 of 15
happens to me on the road too, probably because the frequencies are close enough that they interfere with each other
post #3 of 15
I got it all the time with my old razr. I'd be in my living room and a weird buzz would come out of the surround speakers like 2 seconds before a call came in.
post #4 of 15
Yeah it happens to everyone, bro.
post #5 of 15
^ Yep, my iPhone messes with my tv/speakers and has even woken me up while I was asleep, haha.

It's veeery common now, I like how in GTA4 if you're in a your cell phone rings, the game will sometimes make that sound for the in-car speakers, lol... gotta love the realism
post #6 of 15
its a ghost.


it happens to me too, but not on my laptop or computer. when my cell phone rings or when i would go near my tape player/radio (ya im old schoolin it) i get static.
post #7 of 15
Yeah, it's "gsm buzz" it only happens with GSM phones (AT&T/TMobile) the frequencies of the waves the phone uses are similar to something in the speakers that makes that noise. Sometimes, I hear that buzz before my phone even starts ringing so I know I'm getting a call without the ringer going off yet.
post #8 of 15
The way a GSM signal works (in particular, time division), vs that of a CDMA, is that the transmitter in a sense is being rapidly turned on and off. The buzzing occurs not because of the wavelength of the signal, but because of this rapid switch. Some higher end sound systems have what's called RF shielding, which is the use of radio wave blocking materials to surround sensitive components. Anyone who still has or has ever had an original (iDEN) Nextel knows full and well the true power of time division.

Fixes are limited to shutting off the phone, placing it in a lead box (essentially shutting it off), moving it away from the speakers, or buying a more shielded pair of speakers (aka more expensive).
post #9 of 15
OT, my doorbell goes off when my phone rings....
post #10 of 15
^ Haha, I've never heard that one, that's hilarious
post #11 of 15
I found a simple solution to this gsm buzz. It is called a buzz shield. You simply slip it under your iphone or cellphone. You can find it at Welcome It really works.

Regarding my darwin award mentioned below: The Buzz Shield is slipped under the phone. There is zero impact to the phones ability to send and receive radio waves. Nada, zilch, zippo. The Buzz Shield somehow spreads out the signal, or extends the signal so the phone doesn't have to work as hard. Sounds crazy but it works.
post #12 of 15
Never happened to me. If you have shielded speakers I don't think it should be a problem.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderboy View Post
I found a simple solution to this gsm buzz. It is called a buzz shield. You simply slip it under your iphone or cellphone. You can find it at Welcome It really works.
Lets think about this logically. Besides this being your FIRST post, you're promoting a device that is placed over a phone to block signals that cause speakers to buzz. This would be a good idea, except for one small thing: the signals that make a speaker buzz, are the same signals that allow you to use the phone in the first place. Darwin award for you and your product.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by camhabib View Post
The way a GSM signal works (in particular, time division), vs that of a CDMA, is that the transmitter in a sense is being rapidly turned on and off. The buzzing occurs not because of the wavelength of the signal, but because of this rapid switch. Some higher end sound systems have what's called RF shielding, which is the use of radio wave blocking materials to surround sensitive components. Anyone who still has or has ever had an original (iDEN) Nextel knows full and well the true power of time division.

Fixes are limited to shutting off the phone, placing it in a lead box (essentially shutting it off), moving it away from the speakers, or buying a more shielded pair of speakers (aka more expensive).
i have a nextel phone (one more year......) and it makes noise all the time. my CD alarm clock is the worst, the speakers in the truck are pretty bad too. i don't get too bad of feedback from my laptop.
post #15 of 15
Yea that's normal....

just think if it's messing with the speakers, what is it doing to your brain?

hm....
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