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How to report a fake business?...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Okay I lurked on these forums and people about me ebay pages long enough to spot a fake so I am in a mall a very good well known mall here in NY shopping when me and my bf stop in a store to get his cousin some stuff so this woman shopping for her daughter makes a comment to me about the price of 7 famk jeans and I laugh and say thats the price so I pick up a pair and realize THERE FAKE so I quickly rush to tell my bf then while were talking about it near another display table we notice the girl Lacoste shirts are also fake and since then I found another store that sells fake (TR, 7 FAMK, Lacoste) clothing who can people like me tell to get them to stop.

Its unfair mind u one of the dead giveaways was the price of there stuff u would have thought it was a clearance on 7 FAMK...
post #2 of 19
The best thing to do imo would be to notify 7FAM - phone number is on their web site - and let them handle it. But you could also notify your local FBI office since making/selling counterfits is a federal crime. I remember reading this really cool article about how the FBI was trying to crack these rings selling fake Tiffany jewelry. Good luck!
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxx
The best thing to do imo would be to notify 7FAM - phone number is on their web site - and let them handle it. But you could also notify your local FBI office since making/selling counterfits is a federal crime. I remember reading this really cool article about how the FBI was trying to crack these rings selling fake Tiffany jewelry. Good luck!
I used to try to mind my business BUT when I fell victim to the scheme I was HEATED it was like I was robbed without a gun...

I am def. going to do that cause I am sick of it.
post #4 of 19
I am in NY too...do you not want to identify either the mall or the store??
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvapup
I am in NY too...do you not want to identify either the mall or the store??
I don't mind its CLOTHES HORSE in the Roosevelt field mal...

I love shopping and with any money I get I am @ the mall but I was coming out of Bloomingdales we went in there and I was SHOCKED....
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Sorry about spelling errors I was too anxious to tell u which store it was the second store I dont know the exact name its a regular small boutiques type in manhattan.
post #7 of 19
Yeah, its good to identify it IMO, if they are selling fakes. Next time I go over there to Roosevelt Field I am going to check it out for sure! I hate fakes, and even more so in a B&M store!
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvapup
Yeah, its good to identify it IMO, if they are selling fakes. Next time I go over there to Roosevelt Field I am going to check it out for sure! I hate fakes, and even more so in a B&M store!
Please do cause I can see yall pro's at it the store is to your right of bloomies I am not saying everything in there is fake but I know fake pink A pockets with crystals when I see them.
post #9 of 19
I believe they even have online stores though I am not 100% sure. Here's the link http://clotheshorseonline.net/search...anufacturer=23.

If some companies kinda use the same TR horseshoe back pocket stitching in their products but label them as their own brand products, are they cosidered illegal?
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikyo
If some companies kinda use the same TR horseshoe back pocket stitching in their products but label them as their own brand products, are they cosidered illegal?
They are copies, IMO, and the brands in question should go after them as trademark infringement....IF they have trademarked/copyrighted their designs..
They have that kind of thing all over..Delia's, Target have copied Antik's, Vanilla Star copies Hollister, Abercrombie, TR & lots else. These don't count as counterfeits since they have their own labels, just the designs are copied..
post #11 of 19
Too bad... they are not counterfeits at all still they steal other brands' design. I guess they might be in the gray area when it comes to a lawsuit.
post #12 of 19
I have gotten a fake Juicy Couture long sleeve shirt with Clothes Horse tags on it and I was wondering what the heck Clothes Horse was
It is a VERY good fake, the only thing that sets it off is that the inside tag is the wrong color for the size. I have Juicy polos I know are auth, and this fake one has the same mother of pearl buttons, same quality of fabric, everything - I was shocked that a fake looked this good.
The only thing that confuses me is that the clothes horse website is selling lots of stuff that hasn't been faked yet, so i dont know if they are the same thing...
post #13 of 19
Ok, it is the same Clothes Horse that is located in the Roosevelt Field Mall, never mind.
post #14 of 19
I just double checked the polo and compared the Juicy hang tags to my real ones - the Clothes Horse polo has the darker gold/slick tags that fakes are known for, so its not just the inside tag that is off. Still, they have a lot of Juicy on their website that I have never seen faked and everything on their site is the same price as auth. stuff.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
See I cant believe this THEY NEED TO BE STOP...

Like really if someone gives me the number of who to call and report I would do it in a heart beat that is really jacked up business are doing this to people.
post #16 of 19
Go to 7FAM website & get their contact # off of it.
post #17 of 19
See US Code Sec. 2320. Trafficking in counterfeit goods or services:

http://www.washingtonwatchdog.org/do...3/sec2320.html

It's a federal crime with very stiff penalties. So you can call your local police or FBI. And if they ship using USPS it's mail fraud and you can report them to USPS.

Good luck!
post #18 of 19

Hi to all readers, 

GALLERY 925 SCAM SHOP

In March I sold Gallery 925 a piece of jewellery with two undamaged pendants and sent it to Gallery 925 on 23rd March. In April Gallery 925 requested to return the jewellery for a full refund of $6,145.80. In accordance with my eBay refund policy I refunded Gallery 925 $6,145.80 on 14th April 2013 via Pay Pal. I later received a shipment from Gallery 925 on 18th April 2013. Upon inspection of the received goods, they are clearly different from the originally sold goods. Pictures we have clearly shows that Gallery 925 swapped out two of the flower pendants from the neck ring, with similar pendants, but not the same ones! The pictures show that the new pendants I received back are damaged and are a different colour tone than the ones I originally sent!! The goods I received back from Gallery 925 are worth far less than the goods I originally sent to Gallery 925. I have refunded Gallery 925 the full purchase price but have not received my original goods back! I request that Gallery 925 either send me back the original goods OR reimburse me $6145.80
Gallery 925 has been appealing this case since the refund date..
We have proof that the she returned FAKE jewellery, we know that the jewellery we received back is not the same as the original jewellery we sold Gallery 925.
PLEASE RETURN THE ORIGINAL GEORGE JENSEN NO:238 THAT WE SOLD YOU OR REFUND US $6145.80
 
We have reported this business to:  BBB
 
                                                     IC3
 
                                                     FBI
 
                                                     REVIEWSTALK, YELLOWBOT, RIPOFF REPORT, SITE JAPPER, AND MANY OVERSEAS 
                                          
                                                     WEBSITES, FACEBOOK,  INTERNATIONAL WEBSITES, WE WILL KEEP UP THE PRESSURE!

                                                     PEOPLE ARE ENTITLED TO KNOW CRIMINELS/SCAMMERS
                                                   
post #19 of 19

Gallery 925 / Leo Olsen

 

Most stories of people being conned on the internet carry the admonition “buyer beware”, but the case of Leo Olsen shows that sellers too can be at risk from unscrupulous traders. Mr Olsen has been fighting since early 2013 for a San Francisco jewellery trader to honour her promise to purchase a rare “Georg Jensen” necklace and belt buckle.

Jensen, who lived from 1866 to 1935, developed a word class reputation as a silversmith. His Art Nouveau designs proved exceedingly popular and his business rapidly expanded beyond Copenhagen; before the end of the 1920s he had opened retail outlets in New York, London, Paris, Stockholm and Berlin. Since then dozens of designers, most of them Danish, have produced jewellery under the Georg Jensen brand. When new, these pieces are sold by company stores or, in places such as Australia, through high end retailers such as David Jones. Pieces bearing the Jensen name are highly collectable, and often sell for large sums.

Unfortunately, once the jewellery is put up for re-sale there is no accreditation of dealers, and as a result many businesses have set themselves up as Jensen “experts” despite having no connection to the Copenhagen business nor to its worldwide network of stores.

When Leo Olsen turned to eBay to sell his Georg Jensen necklace and belt buckle he expected it might sell privately, to a collector such as himself, but was pleasantly surprised when the winning bid – for $6,145.80 – came from Gallery Nine Two Five, a California business which represents itself as “specializing in 20th century silver, featuring Georg Jensen at the head of the collection”.

Having received payment through eBay, Mr Olsen duly packaged his items and shipped them to the gallery. It was then that his problems started.

Gallery Nine Two Five owner Rachel Prater claimed that the items were received in a damaged condition, though acknowledged they had been well packed for shipping. She used eBay’s internal dispute procedure to request a refund; eBay wrote to Mr Olsen in April, calling him an “outstanding buyer and seller on the site” and noting that he’d bought and sold 62 items since 2006 without any issues. However the auction site said that, since Ms Prater disputed that the description matched the item she’d received, the simplest resolution was for her to return the necklace and belt buckle to Mr Olsen, and Mr Olsen refund her money.

While he had no doubt that the items he’d sent weren’t damaged, Mr Olsen did so, paying the refund before the package arrived from San Francisco. And it’s at this point that the story takes an unusual turn. Generally, buyer and seller would go their separate ways; Ms Prater able to buy jewellery from someone else and Mr Olsen at liberty to sell his necklace and belt buckle to a different buyer.

But what Mr Olsen got back wasn’t his necklace at all. While he says the belt buckle is the one he sent Ms Prater, the necklace is a look-alike, in a slightly different colour – a fake, he claims. And sure enough, it shows signs of damage – dents to the silver in two places and small chips in the coloured enamel.

It seems Gallery Nine Two Five sent Mr Olsen a different neck ring to the one he’d sent them, retaining his to on-sell while saddling him with a copy worth much less than his original.

Since then, Leo Olsen has tirelessly campaigned for justice, hampered by the distance between Perth and San Francisco, by the different legal systems in both countries and by the fact that, at around $6,000, the dispute is about an amount large enough to represent a sizeable loss to the Olsens but hardly enough to justify hiring a US attorney to pursue. “I’ve tried,” he says ruefully, “but they all want 10 or 20 thousand dollars [in their trust accounts] before they’ll even start”.

eBay, understandably, say they’re not experts in verifying the provenance of jewellery and simply applied a hard-and-fast rule: if the buyer complains the item received doesn’t match the description, the easiest solution is that they get their money and the seller gets their item back to try again.

He’s also filed a complaint with the WA Police – who say it’s outside their jurisdiction – the ACCC and with a US government agency, the Internet Crime Complaint Centre (IC3), a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C).

Strangely, Mr Olsen even complained to the Better Business Bureau, of which Gallery Nine Two Five is a member. The BBB claims it “sets standards for ethical business behavior and monitors compliance”, giving its member businesses a ranking based on a number of factors, including the number of complaints received. Mr Olsen has a copy of the complaint he sent to the Bureau, yet the BB website gives Gallery Nine Two Five a “AAA-“ rating based, amongst other things on there having been “no complaints filed with BBB”.

Australian media have become interested in the case, with local News Corporation paper The Sunday Times running a piece on the issue. “They satisfied themselves that our complaint was truthful before they’d run the story,” Mr Olsen points out. He has also taken to the internet to tell his tale to other would-be buyers and sellers via sites such as Scamwatch and The Rip Off Report.

The Olsens, who are retired, have photos to prove the jewellery they sent to Gallery 925 is not the same as that received after they’d refunded Ms Prater’s money, and have offered to swear affidavits to that effect, and verifying the pieces they sent were in perfect condition. “eBay advised us to wait for the items to arrive and then to inspect them over the following three days before paying the refund,” Mr Olsen admits. “But that’s not how I do business. The buyer wasn’t satisfied so I gave her money back, and in return I thought we’d get our necklace”.

While Mr Olsen was happy with the original bid of just over $6,000 he puts his losses at between US$10,000 and $12,000 – the amount he could have sold the piece for in the United States, where Georg Jensen jewellery attracts high prices. “We just want back what is ours,” Leo Olsen says. “We’ve spent over a year now trying to pressure Ms Prater to return the original items we sent her. She can have what she sent to us back, it’s worthless. She already has her money, all we want is our property back”.

Meanwhile Ms Prater, while maintaining her innocence, seems to have shut up shop on eBay – Gallery 925 is no longer a user. Mr Olsen initially closed his eBay account, upset with the outcome, but has since re-opened it. Again, he has received 100 percent positive feedback since December 2013.

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